Friday, May 15, 2009

Wonton (Dumpling) Noodles - Singapore vs Hong Kong



There are a few cheap and good food near my house (walking distance). I am considered lucky. $2.50 fishball noodles and $2.50 wonton noodles. Yum yum yum...

Perfect texture in the noodles - al-dente. Yes, al-dente Chinese egg noodles, why not? And the noodles in just the right amount of sauce. Too much of the sauce would have drown the noodles soggy and overpowered the base taste of the noodles. I do love green chili at the side of my noodles...it adds just that little oomph as you slurp the noodles and bite on the green chili.

$2.50 wonton noodles at Jalan Batu, near Tanjong Rhu, Singapore

What is the main difference between Singapore wonton noodles and Hong Kong wonton noodles ?

Green chili, of course. Or it's just me, maybe. I like my wonton noodles (dry version) with green chili. And you can never find green chili in HK's wonton noodles. I am not trying to bring limelight to green chili; and give credit or disgrace to what makes or breaks a good plate of wonton noodles.

But if it is noodles SOUP, it is another different story.


YES. I truly think the major difference in Singapore's and Hong Kong's wonton noodle soup lies in the broth. I don't know how Hong Kong does its broth - but the unami flavor in Hong Kong wonton noodle soup has much more depth compared to the Singapore counterpart. Typically, it is also quite common to see white chives sprinkled as garnish in the Hong Kong version; vs Singapore's scallions/spring onions garnish.

The little details do make the difference.

Personally, I prefer Sui Kow (there is addition of shrimps, chestnuts and black fungus in this Chinese dumplng) to Wonton (which has relatively more meat than Sui Kow) . Don't ask me why I am talking about Wonton Noodles if I like Sui Kow.

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